Toledo Cardiology Consultants

IN the COVID -19 Frontline

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ROCHESTER, Minn. — New research from Mayo Clinic shows that lack of sufficient sleep combined with free access to food increases calorie consumption and consequently fat accumulation, especially unhealthy fat inside the belly.

Findings from a randomized controlled crossover study led by Naima Covassin, Ph.D., a cardiovascular medicine researcher at Mayo Clinic, show that lack of sufficient sleep led to a 9% increase in total abdominal fat area and an 11% increase in abdominal visceral fat, compared to control sleep. Visceral fat is deposited deep inside the abdomen around internal organs and is strongly linked to cardiac and metabolic diseases.

The findings are published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, and the study was funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

Lack of sufficient sleep is often a behavior choice, and this choice has become increasingly pervasive. More than one-third of adults in the U.S. routinely do not get enough sleep, in part due to shift work, and smart devices and social networks being used during traditional sleep times. Also, people tend to eat more during longer waking hours without increasing physical activity.

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COVID-19 Get Your Questions Answered.
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Fried-food intake is linked to a heightened risk of major heart disease and stroke, finds a pooled analysis of the available research data, published online in the journal Heart.

And the risk rises with each additional 114 g weekly serving, the analysis indicates.

It's clear that the Western diet doesn't promote good cardiovascular health, but it's not clear exactly what contribution fried food might make to the risks of serious heart disease and stroke, say the researchers.

To shed some light on this, they trawled research databases, looking for relevant studies published up to April 2020, and found 19.

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As people are advised to stay home and as the list of gathering places being closed to limit the spread of the coronavirus grows, people might find themselves shut out of their gym, or choose not to go.

But that doesn't mean they should give up on the idea of fitness entirely, trainers say.

 

And people who do find places to work out in the weeks ahead will want to be aware that gyms can be germy – and they should take steps to protect themselves.

Read all CDC recommendation about exercise during the pandemic time

Heart Patients Warned of Risks from Coronavirus
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The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is starting to hit home for many people in America. The World Health Organization classified it as a pandemic this week, as the outbreak now extends across the globe. Communities are working together to limit its spread. Schools are closing, conferences and public events are being canceled—even professional and college sports have either canceled tournaments or suspended their seasons.  

While everyone is on alert, people with heart disease seem to be at higher risk of developing serious illness from COVID-19. The American College of Cardiology has issued a clinical bulletin to offer guidance about the coronavirus and treating patients with heart conditions (“COVID-19 Clinical Guidance For the Cardiovascular Care Team”). Although what we know is changing rapidly, here are important takeaways for patients and their families.

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Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have uncovered new evidence of the potential health risks of chemicals in tobacco and marijuana smoke.

In a study published online today by EClinicalMedicine, the researchers report that people who smoked only marijuana had several smoke-related toxic chemicals in their blood and urine, but at lower levels than those who smoked both tobacco and marijuana or tobacco only. Two of those chemicals, acrylonitrile and acrylamide, are known to be toxic at high levels. The investigators also found that exposure to acrolein, a chemical produced by the combustion of a variety of materials, increases with tobacco smoking but not marijuana smoking and contributes to cardiovascular disease in tobacco smokers.

Vaping combined with smoking is likely as harmful as smoking cigarettes alone, study finds
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People who smoked traditional cigarettes in addition to using e-cigarettes experienced health effects as harmful as those who smoked cigarettes exclusively.

 

Those effects are associated with a higher risk for cardiovascular disease and death, a new study has found. In a large data analysis of more than 7,100 U.S. adults, researchers examined the association of cigarette and e-cigarette use with inflammation and oxidative stress as biomarkers predicting cardiovascular disease.

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